ALL COUNTRIES
Country
Pakistan
Project Code
HORT/2010/001
Project Title
ACIAR Partners in research for development publication - Issue 1, 2017
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2017-02-02
Partners Issue 1, 2017 - Pakistani Pickled Mango
Pakistani Pickled Mango An intervention identified in the project Mango value chain improvement project (HORT/2010/001) was the commercialisation of traditional mango pickle production.
Date of Information
February 2, 2017
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Processing
Country
Cambodia
Project Code
HORT/2012/003
Project Title
HORT/2012/003: Building a resilient mango industry in Cambodia and Australian through improved production and supply chain practices
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2016-11-30
Fact sheet
The Cambodian mango industry is rapidly expanding, and the Royal Government of Cambodia is seeking to expand domestic and export opportunities for the crop. This growth is evidenced by the December 2015 signing of an MOU with the South Korean Government to develop mango exports. While Cambodian mango varieties such as Keo Romeat are well regarded in markets such as Thailand and Vietnam, there are constraints which need to be addressed before large scale exports can be achieved. In order to address these constraints, ACIAR is building capacity in tree crop research in areas such as varietal selection, crop growth management, pest and disease management, postharvest handling and supply chain management.
Date of Information
November 30, 2016
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Markets
Country
Pakistan
Project Code
HORT/2010/001, HORT/2010/006, ASEM/2010/003
Project Title
ACIAR Partners issue 2, 2016
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2016-07-04
Partners Issue 2, 2016 - Pakistan: Embracing change and transformation
Pakistan: Embracing change and transformation This issue of Partners magazine shares articles about ACIAR's research collaboration with Pakistan including projects focused on key fruit crops including mangoes. HORT/2010/001: ‘Pakistan mango value chain improvement’ HORT/2010/006: ‘Integrated crop management practices to enhance value chain outcomes for the mango industry in Pakistan and Australia’ ASEM/2010/003: ‘Social research to foster effective collaboration and strengthen propoor value chains’
Date of Information
July 4, 2016
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics

Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/forge/www.apmangonet.org/public/wp-content/themes/h-code-child/templates/page-content/classic/cptallcountries.php on line 293
Country
Indonesia
Project Code
HORT/2016/001
Project Title
HORT/2016/001: Evaluating options for further development of mango value chains in Java and Bali
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2016-06-30
Project summary
This SRA will document how area-wide management of fruit flies in mango improved growers’ livelihoods. Indonesia is the sixth biggest mango producer in the world, contributing 4.1% of global production. Small family-owned farms produce most mango, so improving production can increase the incomes of the poor - but the mango industry suffers from poor quality management on farms and infestation by fruit flies. This project builds on project HORT/2008/041 “Area-wide management of pest fruit flies in an Indonesian mango production system”, which between 2010 and 2015 suppressed and maintained fruit flies in trial areas in Indramayu, West Java. That project’s primary aim was to evaluate the area-wide management concept in a new environment, so did not quantify or document improvements along the value chain.
Date of Information
June 30, 2016
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Markets
Country
All
Project Code
MN178
Project Title
A guide to value-chain analysis and development for overseas development assistance projects
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2016-05-04
Newsletter
This value-chain research and training manual consolidates experience from ACIAR projects across Asia and Africa. It sets out the practical steps in adopting a value-chain perspective to understand how to increase the profitability of agrifood value-chains collectively, and of smallholder farmers in particular. The manual is designed to evolve as ACIAR’s knowledge continues to grow, by incorporating future case studies and training materials to offer new insights. We invite contributions from others who share our aspiration to engage in collaborative value-chain research and to promote the sharing of its results.
Date of Information
May 4, 2016
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Markets
Country
Samoa, Tonga
Project Code
HORT/2014/077
Project Title
HORT/2014/077: Enhanced fruit production and postharvest handling systems for Fiji, Samoa and Tonga
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2016-05-01
Project summary
This project will support the development of resilient tropical fruit value chains in Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga; based on the five regionally significant fruit crops: papaya, pineapple, mango, breadfruit, and citrus.  The overall aim of the project is to increase the economic and disaster resilience of selected tropical fruit value-chains.
Date of Information
February 9, 2017
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Markets
Country
Pacific
Project Code
PC/2008/029
Project Title
PC/2008/029: Cost effective disinfestation treatments for Pacific horticulture
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2009-09-14
Report
The project was undertaken to assess the potential for use of disinfestation technologies in export crops of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) to satisfy the market access quarantine requirements of their major trading partners, Australia and New Zealand. A number of agricultural commodities such as taro, ginger, yam, sweet potato and ornamentals have market access to Australia and New Zealand for some PICs (such as Fiji) but not for others. There is also the potential to export a new range of commodities. However, the inability to meet biosecurity requirements limits the capacity of PICs to export. Crops are often fumigated with methyl bromide before export and again on arrival in Australia or New Zealand when live insects, nematodes or snails are found, diminishing quality and shelf life or completely destroying the produce. Good alternative treatments exist but need to be developed for local crops and conditions. Making available acceptable treatment technologies and facilities will encourage growers and exporters to increase volumes and the range of commodities traded. The need and scope of the project was assessed through site visits and meetings with major stakeholders in Fiji including growers, Government regulatory, extension and research staff, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) experts, commercial exporters, and marketing agencies. Priority crops were identified as taro, cutflowers and foliage. Fiji was identified as the priority country in which to initiate the project since it has the most experience in exporting agricultural produce and has the best infrastructure to conduct research, development and extension. Fiji is proposed as a priority country. This will be followed by other PICs such as Samoa, possibly Tonga, and PNG as the research-and-development (R&D) and export programs are developed and experience gained in the new technologies. The disinfestation technologies with the best potential to satisfy quarantine and quality criteria after treatment were identified as hot water treatment (HWT) for taro and some species of cutflowers; and fumigation using a commercial ethyl formate gas mixture (Vapormate) for external insects of taro roots, leaves, cutflowers and ornamental foliage. The appropriate lead organisation is the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia, working jointly with SPC as the in-country project co-ordinator and implementer. The main collaborators are the Ministry of Agriculture, Fiji especially the research, extension and quarantine services. Commercial partners are all the major exporters of taro and specialised floriculture grower exporters. The outcomes of this study are: (i) a revision of the disinfestation project proposal to allow it to proceed to Phase 2 of implementation by cooperating agencies; (ii) a methodology for research on HWT and fumigation to achieve market access; (iii) an approach towards improving the post farmgate supply chain process for taro and cutflowers; (iv) a methodology for commercial development of the selected disinfestation treatments; and (v) a process of training Fijian staff for scientific capacity building. Action is required to present the revised project proposal to all collaborating parties and institutions and negotiate service delivery and implementation.
Date of Information
September 14, 2009
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Biosecurity
Country
Australia, Philippines
Project Code
HORT/2003/071
Project Title
HORT/2003/071: Integrated pest management and supply chain improvement for mangoes in the Philippines and Australia
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2009-08-03
Report
Executive Summary Field studies were conducted to develop improved recommendations for integrated pest management and judicious pesticide use. Baseline data were taken as the basis for the recommendations. Pest identification and monitoring were the indices of knowing the insect population and its degree of damage for the different control methods employed. Data collected from the baseline surveys showed that mango growers/cooperators were dependent solely on chemical control as their method of suppressing pests and diseases having an average of 13 chemical spraying cycles. Most of all the cooperators did not practice insect pest monitoring as their basis for employing control measures. Done only minor pruning or no pruning at all, sanitation and even fertilization scheme were not given too much attention and no soil analysis conducted. Five insect pests were identified namely cecid fly, mango leafhoppers, blossom blight, mango seedborer and mango fruit fly that damage mango leaves, flowers and fruits. Cecid fly damage the new and even old leaves while mango leafhopper and blossom thrips on flowers. On fruits, mango seed borer contributed much of the damage with an average fruit damage of 19.53% followed by mango fruit fly 11.00% and cecid fly 3.47%. Integrated pest management interventions such as regular sanitation, pruning, balanced fertilization, pests monitoring as basis for need-based chemical application, yellow/white sticky and light traps, early bagging, insect pheromone and use of lorsban impregnated plastic successfully reduced the percent fruit damage of 4.78% with 6 spraying cycles done at 8, 15, 21, 35, 42 and 55 days after flower induction and gave significant yield of 139.59 kilos per tree as compared to farmer’s practice with 7.49% and yield of 50.77 kilos per tree. On the cost and return analysis IPM gave the highest return of investment (164.00%) with an increment of 99.50% over that of farmer’s practice (chemical spray alone). Observations on field populations of mango pulp weevil adults at quiescent stage were made. An IPM work plan was developed against 3 pest problems, such as leafhopper, mango pulp weevil (MPW) and fruit fly. This work plan was anchored on 4 IPM strategies, i.e., cultural control, pest monitoring, chemical control and physical control. Crude extracts were collected from mango fruits, male and female weevils (virgin and mated) and male and female weevil frass (virgin and mated) to determine attractancy to virgin female weevils. The components of mated male weevil frass was determined by GC-MS and standard chemicals were used to determine attractancy to virgin female weevils. Data on the survey conducted in northern and southern Palawan was made access to as well as data from mango x-ray examination for MPW infestation. Adult weevils stay up to the main branches of mango trees at quiescent stage. The IPM work plan consisting of cultural, physical and chemical control and pest monitoring was able to reduce MPW population to 2%. Physical control (bagging) enabled the reduction of spray application to 5 times throughout the fruit production period. Mated male frass at 3 frass equivalents elicited the highest attraction (73.3%) to virgin female weevils. Twenty-four components were identified by GC-MS from mated male frass and acetic acid, one of the components is able to elicit the same percentage attraction. Survey in northern Palawan has shown that the area is still free from MPW.
Date of Information
August 3, 2009
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Biosecurity, Markets
Country
Tonga
Project Code
HORT/2006/108
Project Title
HORT/2006/108 : The potential for tropical fruits production in Tonga: a feasibility and constraints analysis
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2008-05-15
Report
This report summarises the findings of the tropical fruit feasibility study conducted in the kingdom of Tonga. It proposes project initiatives for consideration to develop and progress specific activities to improve the production of tropical fruits in Tonga, which directly and indirectly could raise Tongan domestic income and employment through an increase in the value of the tropical fruits sector. Given its favourable climatic and physical conditions and, its relative abundance of suitable land, Tonga would appear to have a comparative advantage in tropical fruit production. The kingdom’s geographic position relative to New Zealand and Australia is also an advantage. Markets and access to markets are also important considerations. Subsistence and part time growers dominate the tropical fruits sector in Tonga. There is lack of diversification of tropical fruits and markets that highlights a higher degree of risk associated with earnings. It is important to take note that remoteness of the islands and high costs often make efficient marketing both within and between the islands difficult. While Tonga's development plans emphasize a developing private sector, advancing agricultural productivity, revitalizing export industries such as squash and vanilla bean, and developing tourism, economic growth must be supported by increased productivity of primary produce. The increases would require significant levels of investment, improved organisational arrangements, and a skilled and motivated labour force. Workshop surveys showed the over-riding outcome expected by participants was to increase the long-term income derived from the tropical fruit sector through increasing productivity and improved market access. Productivity and sustainability, in turn, require the adoption of more efficient farming practices and techniques. This is likely to involve knowledge and skills training directly. Fruit and vegetables are a significant component of the diet of the people of Tonga and could become increasingly important for generating export income. Fruit flies however impose a huge economic drain and cause considerable crop losses. Many fruits and vegetables, mainly bananas, coconut, papaya, and taro, were previously exported to New Zealand, Australia and Japan. These countries regard fruit flies as a major threat. Given its low productivity levels, there is significant scope to increase the production of the Tongan fruit industry. Improving the prospects of fruit production, for example, by introducing new fruit species, replacing fruit imports where appropriate, and to export fruit, were identified as key priorities. To enable the probability of success in future projects, a number of pertinent issues would need to be considered;
  • capacity building and community engagement
  • product development
  • increasing domestic markets
  • importation of new genetic material
  • demonstration trials to facilitate transfer of technology
  • information access and development.
This information and knowledge could be committed to advance economic sustainability, diversify risks, create jobs, and increase householder and stakeholder income. With these skills in place, the opportunities that exist in exporting surplus production could then be progressed at some future time. What is required is trained and skilled Tongans in production and supply chain technologies, information access, development of products suited for local conditions and, coordinated research and maintenance of demonstration and field trials to promote the adoption and adaptation of improved production technologies. The project presents a few elements that could assist in the economic growth of Tonga by:
  • investing in the people of Tonga through strengthening their knowledge base
  • fostering commitment from subsistence producers through training and adoption of improved production and post harvest technologies and thereby improving incomes
  • promoting cooperation and the formation of co-operatives or grower associations and in so doing supporting and enhancing production of quality produce
  • enhancing commitment and engagement between agencies, and strengthening partnerships within and between the region.
 
Date of Information
May 15, 2008
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Information, Markets
Country
Philippines
Project Code
HORT2007/210 and HORT/2007/032
Project Title
HORT/2007/210: Detection surveys for mango seed and pulp weevils in Sarangani, Davao del Sur and Samal Island, Mindanao, Philippines
Resource Type
Project Leader
Date
2008-05-15
Report
Detection surveys for mango seed and pulp weevils were undertaken in the provinces of Sarangani, Davao del Sur and Samal Island in southern Mindanao, the Philippines to determine if mango seed and pulp weevils were present in mango fruit. Fruit surveys commenced in March 2007 and ended in February 2008. Mango seed and pulp weevils are both pests of Quarantine importance and, if present, can impede international trade of fresh mango fruits. The presence of seed weevil in the Philippines is disputed while pulp weevil is only confirmed from the island of Palawan in western Philippines. These intensive surveys aimed to demonstrate the current status of both pests in Sarangani and Samal Island as well as demonstrating ongoing area freedom in Davao del Sur. The three provinces contain important mango producing areas with significant export potential. Survey methodology was developed and agreed to at a meeting held in Canberra in December 2005 between Biosecurity Australia (BA) and the project partners, the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries (DPI&F), Queensland and the Department of Agriculture - Bureau of Plant Industries (DA-BPI), Philippines. The project received the full support of the Provincial Local Government units (LGU) who pledged logistics assistance as required. During the survey, eight mango fruits from each of 10,600 and 2,015 individual bearing trees were collected and processed from Sarangani and Samal Island respectively. Furthermore, fruit from 2,894 mango trees were processed in the ongoing detection survey in Davao del Sur. Trees and fruit were randomly selected, fruits were cut open and the flesh and seed visually inspected for presence of weevils and/or symptoms. At the same time fruit were assessed for damage from other insect pests to provide data on significant insect activity. This information will be useful in a current ACIAR funded project to improve mango pest management and post harvest handling for mango in the Philippines. These results showed no evidence of any stage of seed or pulp weevil in 84,800, 16,120 and 23,152 sample fruits from Sarangani and Samal Island and from Davao del Sur respectively. The project also supported research into the district wide distribution of mango seed weevil in north Queensland commercial and domestic mango trees during 2006/07 as well as studies to develop practical field control strategies. The project has demonstrated that both mango pulp and seed weevils are not present in the provinces surveyed and the data can be used to assist Philippine Quarantine to access export markets via area freedom certification. Many export markets are currently closed to the Philippines due to the uncertain status of these two mango pests of Quarantine importance.
Date of Information
May 15, 2008
Document Owner
Project Leader Country
Content Language
English
Keywords/Tags
Project Topics
Biosecurity